• Kern County Fire

  • Leadership...

  • Integrity...

  • Dedication...

  • Service...

  • Supporting Our Communities...

  • Kern County Fire

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7

Fire Prevention Has Relocated

Please note that as of Monday, March 13, 2017, the Fire Prevention Division of the Kern County Fire Department will no longer be located at the headquarters office (5642 Victor Street, 93308) or Public Services Building (2700 M Street, 93301).

In order to improve Fire Department’s efficiency to our citizens, both offices have been conveniently consolidated under a cost-neutral agreement to relocate to their new location at 2820 M Street, just north of Golden State Avenue. This strategic location (formally the Parks & Recreation Dept.) is across the street from the Public Services Building and will streamline the permit process as a one-stop shop for our constituents.

The Kern County Fire Prevention Division plays a very important role in the Department’s overall mission. This unit is tasked with implementing the policies and programs that reduce the magnitude of emergencies, and prevents or minimizes the loss of life, property, and environmental damage. The Fire Prevention Division provides education to our public, the engineering per the fire code during plan review, and enforcement of the fire code to meet our goals.

We look forward to serving you at our new location. Operating hours will remain 8am – 5pm, Monday through Friday and will be closed for lunch from Noon – 1pm. Also, the Fire Prevention Division can be reached at their new phone number (661) 391-3310 for any questions.

Fire Hazard Reduction Information Update for 2017

A Fire Hazard Reduction Notification has been issued for 2017.   Click the Hazard Reduction Tab for more information.

State Responsibility Area (SRA) Lookup

Cal Fire has provided a data viewer to assist landowners in determining if their property may fall within State Responsibility Area (SRA).  SRA boundaries are those adopted by the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection in January, 2011, updated to reflect changes as of July 1, 2016. They are the official boundaries recognized by the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection to define the areas where CAL FIRE has financial responsibility for fire suppression and prevention. 

Click Here to Access the Cal Fire SRA Viewer.

Received a Hazard Reduction Citation?

If you have received a hazard reduction citation and/or need more information click here to request a review.

Hazard Reduction Burning on State Responsibility Area Land

The Kern County Fire Department is now opening hazard reduction burning on State Responsibility Area (SRA) land.

A significant change has occurred in the communities of Lebec, Frazier Park, and Pine Mountain Club. The Los Padres National Forest will no longer administer SRA hazard reduction burning in Kern County. The Kern County Fire stations in these communities will serve as the permitting authority for their respective response areas. Permits will be made available to the public during business hours from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. As always, permits shall be provided only to those property owners who meet the clearance and safety requirements.

Tree Mortality

Tree Mortality rates throughout California have skyrocketed.   Click here for information.

Isabella Dam Update

Click here for the latest information on the the Isabella Dam from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Kelso Creek Emergency Operations Plan

The Final Draft of the Kelso Creek Communities Emergency Operations Plan has been released.   Click here for access.

Sign Up For Emergency Alerts


  Incident Name: Mesa Incident Incident Time: 10:30:00 a.m. Incident Date: 3-0-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
  Incident Name: Kerrnita Incident Incident Time: 6:35:00 a.m. Incident Date: 2-22-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
  Incident Name: Oregon Incident Incident Time: 10:53:00 a.m. Incident Date: 2-10-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
  Incident Name: Stockton Incident Incident Time: 18:23:00 p.m. Incident Date: 2-9-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Nudgent Incident Incident Time: 04:07:00 p.m. Incident Date: 2-6-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: North Mills Incident Incident Time: 09:10:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-30-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Clinton Incident Incident Time: 04:00:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-27-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Lux Incident Incident Time: 10:00:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-25-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: 20th Street Incident Incident Time: 10:22:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-22-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Panama Incident Incident Time: 9:00:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-18-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Highway 58 Incident Incident Time: 11:26:00 a.m. Incident Date: 1-12-2018 Incident Type: Vehicle...
Incident Name: Olive Incident Incident Time: 11:43:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-12-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Valley Incident Incident Time: 11:33:00 p.m. Incident Date: 1-12-2018 Incident Type: Structure...
Incident Name: Sterling Incident Incident Location: 1200 Block of Sterling Road Incident Time: 12:41:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: South Haley Incident Incident Location: 200 Block of South Haley Incident Time: 5:17:00 p.m. Incident...
Incident Name: San Diego Street Incident Incident Location: 1400 Block of San Diego Street Incident Time: 6:55:00...
Incident Name: Roby Incident Incident Location: 100 Block of Roby Lane Incident Time: 4:45:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Cuddy Valley Incident Incident Location: Intersection of Cuddy Valley Road and Mil Potrero Highway Incident...
Incident Name: F Street Incident Incident Location: 400 block of F Street Incident Time: 09:00:00 p.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Shattuck Incident Incident Location: 200 block of Shattuck Avenue Incident Time: 11:09:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Verna Incident Incident Location: 100 block of Verna Street Incident Time: 06:07:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: East Kern Incident Incident Location: 300 block of East Kern Street Incident Time: 09:49:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Cooper Incident Incident Location: 100 block of Cooper Avenue Incident Time: 06:17:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Van Buren Incident Incident Location: 500 block of Van Buren Street Incident Time: 02:06:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Graas Incident Incident Location: 1400 block of Graas Avenue Incident Time: 06:15:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Chain Incident Incident Location: 1800 block of Chain Avenue Incident Time: 04:45:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: South Street Incident Incident Location: 300 block of South Street Incident Time: 11:08:00 p.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Tommy Incident Incident Location: 22000 block of Tommy Avenue Incident Time: 06:29:00 p.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Santa Rosa Incident Incident Location: 11000 block of Santa Rosa Avenue Incident Time: 05:25:00 a.m. Incident...
Incident Name: Rosedale Incident Incident Location: 17000 block of Rosedale Highway Incident Time: 10:09:00 p.m. Incident...

Latest News

resource-updateKCFD Out-of-County Resource Update December 8, 2017  Firefighters, Fire Crews, Fire Dozers, and even Fire Mechanics from the Kern County Fire Department...
helicopter-articleKern Helicopter In High Demand    This article features helicopters out fitted for night flying in high demand.    Follow the link to a great article...
helitack-herosFirefighters Tackle California Wildfires October 17, 2017    This article features the Helitack Heroes of H408 and includes some quotes and several...
puertorico-deploymentsKCFD Deploys Personnel to Puerto Rico and Throughout California September 27, 2017  The Kern County Fire Department has 60 firefighters battling wildfires...
franklin-arrestedArrest Made September 27, 2017  Today, Kern County Fire Department Arson Investigators arrested Damon Franklin, 41.  Franklin is charged with four...
station72-equipment  New Equipment Delivered to Station 72 in Lake Isabella August 31, 2017  Kern County Firefighters at Station 72 in Lake Isabella received a brand-new...
arson-arrested KCFD ARSON INVESTIGATORS MAKE AN ARREST Public Information Officer: (661) 330-0133 August 11, 2017  Following an exhaustive investigation, Kern...
clagary-final CALGARY FIRE FINAL STATUS UPDATE On Call Fire Information Officer: (661) 330-0133 Wofford Heights, CA:  August 7, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. This will be the...
clagary-assist CALGARY FIRE INFORMATION EVACUATION NOTICE LIFTED  Effective 8 pm August 6, 2017, the Evacuation Advisory for residents of Wofford Heights for the...
firefighters-assistKern County Firefighters Assist Throughout California July 11, 2017 The Kern County Fire Department has sent 64 personnel to assist with battling...
paramadics-supportKCFD Paramedics Provide Advanced Life Support to Mountain Community July 6, 2017 Over the July 4th weekend Paramedics at Kern County Fire Station 58 in...
fireworks-statsFIREWORKS 2017 STATS Fireworks Taskforce Personnel July 4, 2017 15 Call Center Personnel 25  Cost for Personnel...
arson-caught-3July 5, 2017 Calls for Illegal Fireworks The preliminary numbers for calls reporting illegal fireworks on July 4th. The Fireworks Task Force Hotline...
arson-caught-2June 29, 2017 9:30 PM Hub Fire:  Investigators Arrest Man for Arson At approximately 9:30 pm, on Monday June 26, a male subject was taken into custody...
arson-caughtJune 22, 2017 Fire Investigators Arrest Man for Arson On Wednesday June 21 at 9:40pm, Kern County firefighters extinguished a structure fire on the...

KCFD Twitter Feed

KCFD Facebook

Why should I have a working smoke alarm?

A properly installed and maintained smoke alarm is the only thing in your home that can alert you and your family to a fire 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether you’re awake or asleep, a working smoke alarm is constantly on alert, scanning the air for fire and smoke.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, between 2003-2006, more than 66 percent of home fire deaths occurred in homes without a working smoke alarm. A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

What types of smoke alarms are available?

There are many different brands of smoke alarms available on the market, but they fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric.

It cannot be stated definitively that one is better than the other in every fire situation that could arise in a residence. Because both ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms are better at detecting distinctly different, yet potentially fatal fires, and because no one can predict what type of fire might start in a home, the US Fire administration recommends that every residence and place where people sleep be equipped with:

  • Both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR
  • dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors

In addition to the basic types of alarms, there are alarms made to meet the needs of people with hearing disabilities. These alarms may use strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to assist in alerting those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound.

What powers a smoke alarm?

Smoke alarms are powered by battery or they are hardwired into the home’s electrical system. If the smoke alarm is powered by battery, it runs on either a disposable 9-volt battery or a non-replaceable 10-year lithium (“long-life”) battery. A backup battery is usually present on hardwired alarms and may need to be replaced.

These batteries must be tested on a regular basis and, in most cases, should be replaced at least once each year (except for lithium batteries). See the Smoke Alarm Maintenance section for more information.

Are smoke alarms expensive?

Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms cost between $6 and $20. Dual sensor smoke alarms cost between $24 and $40.

Some fire departments offer reduced price, or even free, smoke alarms. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.


Install smoke alarms in key areas of your home

Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Many fatal fires begin late at night or early in the morning, so the U.S. Fire Administration recommends installing smoke alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas.

Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible. Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Some fire departments will install battery-operated smoke alarms in your home at no cost. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.

Hardwired smoke alarms should be installed by a qualified electrician.

Smoke alarm maintenance

Is your smoke alarm still working? Smoke alarms must be maintained! A smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all.

A smoke alarm only works when it is properly installed and maintained. Depending on how your smoke alarm is powered (9-volt, 10-year lithium, or hardwired), you’ll have to maintain it according to manufacturer’s instructions. General guidelines for smoke alarm maintenance:

Smoke alarm powered by a 9-volt battery

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • Replace the batteries at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.

Smoke alarm powered by a 10-year lithium (or “long life”) battery

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • Since you cannot (and should not) replace the lithium battery, the entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Smoke alarm that is hardwired into the home’s electrical system

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • The backup battery should be replaced at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.

Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking

A smoke alarm is just doing its job when it sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam.

  • If a smoke alarm sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam, do not remove the battery. You should:
  • Open a window or door and press the hush” button,
  • Wave a towel at the alarm to clear the air, or
  • Move the entire alarm several feet away from the location.

Disabling a smoke alarm or removing the battery can be a deadly mistake.


For further information go to the U.S. Fire Administration Smoke Alarm Page

Having an escape plan in case of fire is something every family should create and practice. Practicing the escape plan will allow you to work through any issues and solve any dilemmas that may come up as a result of the practice drills.


When Creating Your Family Fire Escape Plan:

  • Identify two ways to escape from every room in the home.
  • Practice your escape plan at least twice a year.
  • Select a safe location away from the home where your family can meet after escaping
  • Consider purchasing and storing escape ladders for rooms above ground level and make sure to learn how to use them.
  • If you have pets, include plans for their evacuation.
  • If you see smoke or fire in your first escape route, use your second way out.
  • If you must exit through smoke, crawl low under the smoke.
  • Before escaping through a closed door, feel the door before opening it. If it is warm, use your second escape route.

If smoke, heat or flames block both of your exit routes, stay in the room with the door closed. Place a rolled towel underneath the door. Signal for help by waving a brightly colored cloth or shining a flashlight at the window. If there is a telephone in the room, call the fire department and let them know your exact location inside the home.

Create your own Escape Plan, Know Two Ways Out of every room.


Help Us Help You: Your Guide to Calling 9-1-1 Emergency Services


To best respond to an emergency situation, call takers, dispatchers and first responders need your help. Familiarize yourself and those living or visiting your home with the following tips to ensure that the 9-1-1 call taker will be able to process your emergency call efficiently and send assistance as quickly as possible.




• When calling 9-1-1, one of the first things you’ll be asked to provide is the location of the emer­gency you’re reporting.

• The call taker may not automatically know your location or may ask you to confirm it.

• Make sure you provide as much detail on your location as possible, such as landmarks, cross streets and mileposts.




• The current 9-1-1 system is designed for voice communications only.

• Texting 9-1-1 is not an option in most locales; you must dial 9-1-1 and speak with a call taker.

• Pull over when driving, if possible. This reduces the chance of a dropped call.

• Lock your keypad when you’re not using your phone, so 9-1-1 isn’t dialed by mistake. For the same reason, don’t put 9-1-1 on speed dial.

• Do not give old phones to children as toys. A wireless phone with no active service can still call 9-1-1.

• If you accidentally call 9-1-1, stay on the line and tell the call taker that you do not have an emergency.

• Calling 9-1-1 from a cell phone is always free and it is never necessary to dial an area code.



• Call 9-1-1 for emergencies only. It is appropri­ate to call 9-1-1 when you need to save a life, stop a crime or report a fire.

• 9-1-1 is the right number to call in an emergency when a prompt response is needed.

• If you are not sure you have an emergency to report, call 9-1-1 and let the call taker decide.




• Before you need help in an emergency, be sure to understand how the type of phone you use affects your call to 9-1-1. It is important to know the capabilities of the device you are using (landline, cellular, VoIP).

• Cell phones may not automatically tell 9-1-1 where you are so be prepared to provide de­tailed information about your location.




• Try to stay calm, give information and follow all instructions.

• Professional call-takers are trained to get infor­mation from you. Listen carefully and answer as concisely as possible.

• Remember that even if the dispatcher is still asking questions or giving instructions, help is on the way.




• The more you know what to expect when you call 9-1-1, the faster 9-1-1 can get you the help you need.

• You can save a life! Follow all instructions the 9-1-1 call taker gives you, and don’t hang up until the call taker does. If you get cut off, call back and explain that you were cut off.

This information is a public service of The National 9-1-1 Education Coalition.

Text Size